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an idea is born

"When you sail in from Europe or elsewhere in Britain, the first thing you will see will be these colossal horses' heads welcoming you to Scotland." Andy Scott, Sculptor
 

The Kelpies - monuments to equine history

Open now - Book your tour of The Kelpies now

The Kelpies tower a colossal 30 metres above the Forth & Clyde canal and form a dramatic gateway to the canal entrance on the East Coast of Scotland. Sculpted by Andy Scott, The Kelpies are a monument to horse powered heritage across Central Scotland.

Keep up with The Kelpies as they settle in to their new home - follow them on Facebook or Google+

An Icon is Born

Construction of The Kelpies began on the 17th June 2013 at The Helix. Rising out of the ground in a feat of remarkable engineering ingenuity, The Kelpies construction was a stunning process to observe. From week to week progress was awesome, and we have tracked, captured and shared that progress on our social media networks and here on the Helix Website. Follow this process as this stunning artwork settles into it's new home.

The Helix is a 350ha park built on land between Falkirk & Grangemouth. Built as a Living Landmark, The Helix connects 16 communities across the Falkirk Area.

The Kelpies are the central piece of Helix Art and are the symbol of a transformed, enduring new greenspace.

The Kelpies

Each of The Kelpies stands up to 30 metres tall and each one weighs over 300 tonnes. They are constructed of structural steel with a stainless steel outer skin.

This stainless steel skin reflects the light of the day, and the night, and makes for an amazing sight in all weather - the selection of photos above gives you a taste of this transformational effect.

The two massive horses' heads are positioned either side of a specially constructed canal lock and basin - part of The Kelpies Hub.

Watch the construction of The Kelpies in magnificient timelapse below:

 

 

 

Pre book your tour tickets now

Kelpie

The Kelpies very own official website.

Forth & Clyde Canal